The "Prairie Chicken House" designed by architect Herb Greene in late 1950's and built in 1961 in Oklohoma, USA. It looks like Frank Gehry met with Zaha Hadid in the prairie. What's interesting about it is that it drew attention when famous photographer Julius Shulman photographed it to be published in LIFE magazine. Hadn't Shulman found and photographed the house, maybe it would have been left unnoticed and unmaintained to be lost forever.  Here is a short video about the project and a talk with Herb Greene.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rpSXpBE8q0

Giovanni Hänninen’s new work on the blank advertisement billboards depicts the eerie atmosphere of Milan under Corona lockdown. The white canvas of large commercial billboards stripped away when the city is struck with the deadly virus and lockdown measures were introduced. His photographs starkly show us how much surface area was actually reserved for commercial advertisement in the cities. Even though he titled his work as "Missing Piece" I would like to think it is a witty irony. More about his work may be found in DOMUS  and in his website.   

The renovation and the newly built extension of the Museum De Lakenhal in Leiden, Belgium has been completed recently. It was designed by the Dutch practice Happel Cornelisse Verhoeven and the British practice Julian Harrap Architects. I was informed by Divisare's newsletter about this interesting heritage project. What grabbed my attention is the hero image used in the newsletter, shot by Karen Borghouts. It is almost surreal. Compared to neighbouring buildings the museum extension looks like a drawing, almost without any depth. Obviously the flat windows aligned to the surface of the facade enhances this perception. The photo is super crisp,

I came across this image of the Egyptian pyramid on Facebook through my dear friend Deniz Güner's feed. It struck me immediately by the humorous contrast and stark simplicity. I didn't know Judy Dater as an architectural photographer before. A simple google search reveals that she was a well-known portrait photographer and feminist from California. So, it is natural that she didn't appear on my radar before. She was best known with her Imogen and Twinka at Yosemite photo in 1974. The above photograph of the pyramid with a snacks booth is from a series of photographs she took during her visit to